Women’s Backpacks For School

Heading back to school is not just for kids these days. With all the down-sizing going around having a better education plays a major role. This means hitting the educational trail!

This is not grade school here this is college and we are not adolescents we are woman and like most woman we still want fashion as well as practicability. Especially since (depending you work load) you will be toting a round enough books you could start your own lending facility.

While a tote bag might be an adorable accessory, it is really not doable for heavy awkward books. And…regardless if basic black is chic in dresses; in backpacks for school – it’s just not cool.

Relax, take a deep breath because there are numerous schoolbags out there that take the brunt of the weight off your back, hold all your books as well as everyday personal items and still sport a very fashion forward look. Plus a lot of these backpacks are inexpensive enough to allow you purchase more than one so you will be able to accessorize. All women know how important that is!

For the lighter lab days consider a Baggallini. They are ideal for a couple of small books, an essential note pad, writing tools and any other fundamental necessities. These bags are neither your everyday average backpack nor do they offer any flashy statement. They are simply stately. They come in leather or nylon and offer up zipper pockets, adjustable handles, and magnetic closures. Additionally Baggallini backpacks are more than just backpacks. They multiply their advantage by being able to be converted to crossbody bags or just an everyday purse.

When you are picking and choosing your backpacks check out the Seal Line for spotlighting seriousness and dependability. They are the top of the line in the weather defying field. If rain or sleet and snow are threatening your college campus, be sure to pull out this backpack. With it sturdy straps it’s the one you’ll need when biking to school or walking across the university grounds in muck and mire.

If you’re looking to impress professors and dazzle them with your organizational skills then an Ellington is a must. They have bags that provide numerous inside and outside pockets, along with an amazing panel that will allow you to make sure there is a place for everything and everything is in its place. Even your keys! It’s a take charge kind of backpack.

There are other lines of backpacks for school you can consider. The Overland Cambridge backpack screams professionalism and efficiency. The Flyweight from North Face offers durability with seemingly weightlessness. Finally for the “girl” in us all there are the Harajuku backpacks for school. They offer sweet and appealing mixed with amusement all lying within their Japanese trend setting scenes.

Bishojo and Moe Characters – The Ideal Female in Japanese Anime and Videogames

“Bishojo” is a Japanese term literally meaning “beautiful girl,” and usually refers to genres of anime and video games that are centered on them. What is considered to be bishojo is subjective to its artists and audiences; such characters can have but are not limited to:

  • Large, endearing eyes to convey her emotions — a characteristic of the anime-art style
  • An ideal female body shape — the hourglass figure
  • An emphasis of the breasts by making them large, giving her sex appeal
  • A wide array of hairstyles, even those that seem impossible in real life
  • Have a wardrobe that includes skirts, blouses, and dresses
  • Moe characteristics

“Moe,” pronounced “mo-eh,” literally referring to a budding plant, is an informal Japanese term meaning a type of feeling towards anime female characters. The moe character exudes an aura of innocence, through her appearance and quirky personality; we might be attracted to her so much that we desire to be with her — to protect her, to be her boyfriend, to be her father, because in our minds she represents the ideal female.

Take the anime series, “K-On!” for example — it can be considered bishojo and moe anime. Mio Akiyama, among fans of the series, is a popular character because she displays moe characteristics. Though she is shown to be serious, we also see her embarrassed and frightened; she generates her audience’s desire to console her as well as protect her from her friend Ritsu Tainaka, who happens to tease her frequently. Mio can also be bishojo due to her hime (hii-may) cut hairstyle; though, all of the female characters of K-On! can be bishojo because the school uniforms they wear make them look cuter (subjective).

Visual novels (VNs) are a popular genre of game in Japan, and are another major source of bishojo and moe characters aside from anime series. The majority of VNs involve romance between a male protagonist and several female romantic prospects. Usually the male protagonist is depicted as a young Japanese or Asian, as it’s assumed that whoever plays such VNs is a male of Asian descent, giving him someone to identify with. A player sees the world in his view, and eyes a girl whom he deems bishojo and moe. He desires to be with her maybe because of her beautiful long black hair and clumsy personality, or he identifies her with a girl he has known in real life — he thus plays the game to vicariously have a relationship with her. In the end, he can have sex with her (in adult-oriented VNs), and/or marry and have children with her.

One might argue that bishojo and moe characters are objectifying the female sex mostly because of the nature of the anime art style. However, others argue it’s not — she offers herself for him to protect, offers herself for him to be with her, and most importantly offers her eternal love and support, not as an object but as if she were a real human female. She can represent a girl a guy has loved, and offer him a second chance with her, giving him a fantasy he cannot otherwise achieve in real life.

The world is an imperfect place and is filled with many broken hearts and loneliness. Bishojo and moe characters offer a perfect fantasy for male, as well as female, audiences to escape the harshness of the real world. It’s a potent concoction that can elicit feelings of longing and nostalgia.

Hannibal Missouri – A Ghost Town?

It’s not a ghost town yet but it’s getting there. I spent a day in Hannibal, Missouri. I’m a high school English teacher and just couldn’t pass up the chance to visit the home of the American author, Samuel Clemens, better known as Mark Twain. Mid-July I expected the streets of Hannibal to be teeming with sightseers anxious to catch a glimpse of the spot on the Mississippi River where Twain’s hero Huck Finn set sail on his raft . I thought folks would be lined up in droves to tour the Clemens homestead and visit the caves where Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn had so many adventures. But on a steamy summer afternoon I browsed in solitary pleasure through shops replete with Twain novels, biographies and souvenirs. A Japanese tourist and a father and son from England were the only other people visiting Becky Thatcher’s cottage with me. A boy and girl dressed up like Tom Sawyer and his girlfriend Becky looked bored as they waited for tourists to show up and pay $7 to have their picture taken with the famous literary couple. Horse drawn carriages toured the city carting only a few passengers each. I attended an excellent one-man show put on by actor Richard Garey. Standing on a stage crammed with Twain memorabilia, Garey did a lively and educational re-creation of one of Twain’s lectures and story telling presentations. Mark Twain traveled across the United States entertaining crowds of people in the late 1800’s Unfortunately only eight of us were in attendance at the show Garey staged in Hannibal on a July night.

Don’t get me wrong. Hannibal, Missouri is charming. It’s just that the whole place appears to be a little ‘down on its luck.’ We stopped at two bed and breakfast establishments that looked lovely and appealing in the brochures we’d picked up. The doors were locked, the paint peeling and the yards overgrown. The high school English teacher who supplemented his income by running the book store at the Mark Twain museum had plenty of time to ‘talk shop’ with me since I was his only customer. We wanted to try a local Hannibal restaurant for supper, but by seven o’clock many were closed, and others I have to admit looked just a little on the seedy side. We finally settled on Lula Belles, a former bordello turned now into a respectable eatery. It was founded by an enterprising madam from Chicago at the turn of the century. The food was hardly gourmet, but the portions were plentiful and the service friendly. You couldn’t help remembering however that it used to be a centre for gambling and prostitution and was frequently raided by the police. Did the ‘ladies of the evening’ who made their living there a hundred years ago still haunt the place one wondered?

Literary tourism appears to be flourishing. People are flocking to the sites mentioned in the popular book the Da Vinci Code. The Prince Edward Island tourist industry thrives on the Anne of Green Gables books authored by Lucy Maud Montgomery. So what’s the problem in Hannibal, Missouri, the setting for Twain’s novels? I checked some traveler review web sites which mentioned several reasons for Hannibal’s decline including lack of advertising, limited hours of operation and an almost cynical attitude amongst residents about their famous home town author.

I enjoyed Hannibal, Missouri and was glad I had visited. Hopefully the town will be able to make the necessary changes to attract more tourists. Otherwise it might become a place inhabited only by the ghosts of Mark Twain and the interesting cast of characters he created in his memorable novels.